Right at Home was recently featured in The Columbia Tribune in an article titled, “Right at Home to open in Columbia.”  The article details the Morse’s background in the healthcare industry and the increase in the senior home care industry in Columbia, as well as nationally. The article discusses some of the services that Right at Home offers and the increasing demand for this type of service.  For the entire click here or begin below.

Right at Home to open in Columbia
By: Jacob Barker

As the U.S. population continues to age while the Baby Boom generation enters its golden years, Todd and Shelley Morse are looking to step in and capitalize on the need for home-care services.

This week, the two opened a local franchise of Right at Home, an Omaha, Neb.-based company with more than 200 offices across the country that provides in-home care for seniors and disabled adults.

“With the baby boomers, everybody’s aware we’ve got an aging population,” Todd Morse said. “We’ve got a care-giving crisis in this country.”

The Morse’s Right at Home franchise will serve the Columbia and Jefferson City areas and is based out of 4800 Santana Circle in south Columbia. The business provides services such as transportation, housekeeping and personal care. Both have experience in the health care field — Todd worked as a surgical consultant and a pharmaceutical representative, and Shelley was a personal care attendant. They’ll be hiring caregivers as they gain clients, and they plan to not stay confined to the back office.  

“We’ll be wearing a lot of different hats,” Todd Morse said. “And that’s something we’re always going to want to do, just make sure we always have an involvement in the day-to-day operations of the business regardless of how big we grow.”

Investment in services for seniors has been booming in Columbia recently, with the most visible examples being the multimillion-dollar building projects by more traditional senior care providers Lutheran Senior Services and Americare. But more and more experts have been pointing to the cost savings of providing at-home care for the elderly. That effort, though, was dealt a blow in October when the Obama administration, citing unworkable costs, scrapped a portion of its health care law that provided long-term care insurance.

Still, the Morses are confident that the demand for their services will grow. Some Medicaid waivers can cover their services, and more and more people are buying long-term care insurance.

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